Federal White-Collar Crimes

White-collar crime is a phrase that refers to financially-motivated criminal offenses allegedly committed by people who are usually in powerful positions. While these crimes are typically nonviolent offenses, they often still have the potential to cause serious monetary harm to innocent people or companies.

Because so many white-collar crimes potentially affect interstate or foreign commerce, it is not uncommon for federal agencies to investigate the offenses and prosecute the alleged offenders. Federal prosecutors will often attempt to cast a wide net in order to have some alleged offenders testify against other defendants in exchange for a reduction or dismissal of criminal charges, but it is critical for anybody accused of a white-collar crime to have legal counsel before speaking to any federal agents about an investigation or criminal charges.

Lawyer for Federal White-Collar Crimes in Columbus, OH

Do you think that you might be under investigation or have you already been arrested or indicted for an alleged federal white-collar offense in Central Ohio? Do not make any kind of statement to authorities without legal representation. Contact Joslyn Law Firm today.

Brian Joslyn is an experienced criminal defense attorney in Columbus who represents clients accused of federal offenses in communities throughout the greater Franklin County area, including Bexley, Dublin, Grove City, Gahanna, Upper Arlington, Westerville, Reynoldsburg, Hilliard, Whitehall, Worthington, and many others. He can provide an honest and thorough evaluation of your case when you call (614) 444-1900 to schedule a free, confidential consultation.


Overview of Federal White-Collar Crimes in Ohio


Back to top

Types of Federal White-Collar Crimes in Franklin County

Federal white-collar charges typically carry penalties that are much more serious than those filed at the state level. The prosecutors handling these cases have far greater resources to work with in order to collect evidence and build formidable cases.

Numerous financially-motivated crimes are established under federal law, and some of the most common white-collar offenses include, but are not limited to:

  • Bankruptcy Fraud, 18 U.S. Code § 157 — Concealing assets, filing false or incomplete forms or information, or attempting to bribe a bankruptcy trustee are some of the offenses that can be considered bankruptcy fraud, and a conviction is punishable by up to five years in prison and/or a fine of up to $250,000.
  • Embezzlement, 18 U.S. Code §§ 641-670 — Chapter 31 of Title 18 of the U.S. Code establishes 30 different kinds of embezzlement offenses, with several crimes being punishable by up to 10 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $250,000. A conviction for theft, embezzlement, or misapplication by bank officer or employee (Title 18 U.S. Code § 656) is punishable by up to 30 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $1 million.
  • Insurance Fraud, 18 U.S. Code § 1033 — Alleged offenders who knowingly, with the intent to deceive, make any false material statement or report or willfully and materially overvalue any land, property, or security in connection with any financial reports or documents presented to any insurance regulatory official or agency or an agent or examiner appointed by such official or agency to examine the affairs of such person, and for the purpose of influencing the actions of such official or agency or such an appointed agent or examiner, can be sentenced to up to 10 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $250,000.
  • Mail Fraud , 18 U.S. Code § 1341 — An alleged offender who uses the United States Postal Service or any interstate carrier in the foreseeable furtherance of a scheme to defraud involving a material deception with the intent to deprive another party of either property or honest services can be sentenced to up to five years in prison and/or a fine of up to $250,000. Alleged offenses affecting financial institutions or occurring in relation to a presidentially declared major disaster or emergency are punishable by up to 30 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $1 million.
  • Wire Fraud , 18 U.S. Code § 1343 — An alleged offender who uses an interstate telephone call or electronic communication in the foreseeable furtherance of a scheme to defraud involving a material deception with the intent to deprive another party of either property or honest services can be sentenced to up to five years in prison and/or a fine of up to $250,000. Alleged offenses affecting financial institutions or occurring in relation to a presidentially declared major disaster or emergency are punishable by up to 30 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $1 million.
  • Bank Fraud, 18 U.S. Code § 1344 — An alleged offender who knowingly executes, or attempts to execute, a scheme or artifice to defraud a financial institution or to obtain any of the moneys, funds, credits, assets, securities, or other property owned by, or under the custody or control of, a financial institution, by means of false or fraudulent pretenses, representations, or promises can be sentenced to up to 30 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $1 million.
  • Laundering of Monetary Instruments, 18 U.S. Code § 1956 — More commonly referred to as “money laundering,” an alleged offender who conceals the origins of illegally obtained funds can be sentenced to up to 20 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $500,000 or twice the value of the property involved in the transaction, whichever is greater.
  • Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act (RICO Act), 18 U.S. Code §§ 1961-1968 — An alleged offender who engages in racketeering activity performed as part of an ongoing criminal enterprise can be sentenced to up to 20 years in prison and/or a fine of up to twice the gross profits or other proceeds derived from criminal activities.
  • Telemarketing Fraud, 18 U.S. Code §§ 2325-2327 — People convicted of mail or wire fraud in connection with the conduct of telemarketing can be sentenced to an additional 10 years in prison and/or fine of up to $100,000.
  • Securities Fraud, 18 U.S. Code § 3301 — Securities and commodities fraud (18 U.S. Code § 1348) is punishable by up to 25 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $1 million. Violations of the Securities Exchange Act of 1934 (15 U.S. Code 78ff) are punishable by up to 20 years in prison and/or a fine of up to $5 million. Violations of the Securities Act of 1933 (15 U.S. Code § 77x), the Investment Advisers Act of 1940 (15 U.S. Code § 80b–17), the Investment Company Act of 1940 (15 U.S. Code § 80a–48), or the Trust Indenture Act of 1939 (15 U.S. Code § 77yyy) are punishable by up to five years in prison and/or a fine of up to $10,000.

Back to top

Federal White-Collar Crime Conspiracy Charges in Columbus

Conspiracy is one of the most common criminal offenses charged in federal courts. Because white-collar crimes are usually very complex and typically involve more than one alleged offender, conspiracy charges are especially frequent in relation to financially-motivated offenses.

Under Title 18 U.S. Code § 371, a conspiracy charge involves two or more persons conspiring either to commit any offense against the United States, or to defraud the United States, or any agency thereof in any manner or for any purpose, and one or more of such persons do any act to effect the object of the conspiracy. Alleged offenders can still face conspiracy charges even if the people involved never committed the alleged acts or an alleged offender had a minimal role in the conspiracy.

Conspiracy convictions can be punishable by up to five years in prison and/or a fine of up to $250,000 for individuals or $500,000 for organizations, although some conspiracy offenses—such as those allegedly relating to racketeering crimes—may result in the same penalties as the underlying offenses. People who are accused of participating in a conspiracy to commit a white-collar crime need to make sure that they have a skilled criminal defense lawyer capable of proving that they withdrew from the alleged conspiracy or that the prosecutor lacks the evidence necessary to prove their guilt beyond a reasonable doubt.


Back to top

Ohio Resources for Federal White-Collar Crimes

White-Collar Crime | FBI — The FBI is the prime federal law enforcement agency in the United States. On this section of the FBI website, you can learn more about the types of white-collar offenses that the agency handles. The FBI has field offices all over the nation as well as satellite offices—known as resident agencies. One such resident agency is located in Columbus and serves Delaware County, Fairfield County, Fayette County, Franklin County, Knox County, Licking County, Madison County, Morrow County, Pickaway County, and Union County.

FBI Satellite Office
425 W Nationwide Blvd
Columbus, OH 43215
(614) 224-1183

Southern District of Ohio | Department of Justice — The United States Attorney’s Office represents the federal government in cases handled in United States District Courts. Ohio has two districts, and Columbus is located in the state’s Southern District. On this section of the website for the United States Attorney’s Office for the Southern District, you can learn more about the current United States Attorney for the Southern District, the different divisions of the office, and some of its community-based crime and drug prevention programs.

U.S. Attorney's Office
303 Marconi Boulevard, Suite 200
Columbus, OH 43215
(614) 469-5715


Back to top

Joslyn Law Firm | Columbus Federal White-Collar Crimes Lawyer

If you were arrested, indicted, or believe that you could be currently under investigation in Central Ohio for any kind of alleged white-collar criminal offense, it is in your best interest to immediately retain legal counsel. Joslyn Law Firm aggressively defends clients in communities all over Union County, Pickaway County, Madison County, Delaware County, Licking County, Fairfield County, and Franklin County.

Columbus criminal defense attorney Brian Joslyn is admitted to the United States District Court for the Southern District of Ohio and the United States District Court for the Northern District of Ohio. You can have him review your case and discuss your legal options during a free initial consultation as soon as you call (614) 444-1900 or fill out an online contact form.


Back to top