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Sexual Battery Defense Lawyers

We have a proven track record of success in handling over 15,000 criminal cases and consistently awarded as one of Ohio’s top criminal defense firms. We are highly experienced sexual battery defense lawyers lawyers. Experience matters when dealing with these cases, which prosecutors and judges handle differently on a case by case basis. We know what to expect and what to do to get the best result possible.

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Columbus Sexual Battery Defense Lawyers

There is no single definition of “sexual battery” in Ohio. Instead, sexual battery is a broad crime encompassing thirteen categories of sexual conduct. Sexual battery is often a lesser included offense of rape in Ohio and acts as a “catch-all” for sexual conduct falling short of rape itself.  General criminal “battery” (whether sexual or otherwise) doesn’t require physical violence or injury. Battery encompasses any type of “unwanted” or “offensive” touching, and sexual battery means the unwanted contact was of a qualifying sexual nature. From the brush of a hand to an intoxicated sexual encounter, Ohio defendants may find themselves facing unexpected sexual battery charges.

Selecting an Experienced Columbus Sexual Battery Attorney for Your Criminal Defense 

Those accused of sexual battery are stigmatized almost as soon as charges are levied. “Innocent until proven guilty” seemingly doesn’t apply to alleged sexual offenders in Ohio’s court of public opinion. At the Joslyn Law Firm, our dedicated Columbus sexual battery defense attorneys know the story is seldom one-sided. Angry parents or disgruntled ex-lovers may bring fraudulent sexual battery charges, and sexual offense charges are sometimes filed for leverage in divorce and child custody proceedings. We listen to our clients at the Joslyn Law Firm and are there for you at every step of the investigation, prosecution, and appeals process. To schedule you free, confidential Ohio sexual battery defense consultation with one of our experienced Columbus criminal defense attorneys, contact us online or by calling 614-444-1900 today.

Columbus Information Center from Our Ohio Sexual Battery Lawyers

Whether you’ve been charged with sexual battery in Columbus or are the victim of sexual assault, consult the Joslyn Law Firm’s sexual battery information center and FAQs to learn more about what constitutes sexual battery in Ohio. 

  1. Defining Sexual Battery in Ohio
  2. The Ohio Sexual Battery Statute & Common Uses as a Lesser Included Offense
  3. Understanding the Legal Elements of Sexual Battery in Ohio
  4. Sexual Battery Investigations, Special Prosecutors, and Common Evidence Used in Sexual Battery Cases
  5. Ohio Court Process for Sexual Battery Cases & Common Evidence
  6. Possible Direct Penalties of an Ohio Sexual Battery Conviction
  7. Possible Indirect Penalties of a Columbus Sexual Battery Conviction
  8. Common Defenses to Sexual Battery Charges in Ohio
  9. Columbus Sexual Battery FAQs
  10. Ohio Sexual Assault Resources 

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1.  Defining Sexual Battery in Ohio

Every state defines rape, sexual battery, and sexual assault differently. What qualifies as rape in one state is not even a sex crime in others. For example, marriage is a complete defense to certain categories of rape and sexual battery in Ohio but is never a defense to sex crimes in New York. Understanding these statutory nuances often means the difference between serious felony charges and acquittal in Columbus.  

There are thirteen (13) categories of sexual battery in Ohio, but they do not apply if the parties to the offense are married. Each category requires the parties to have engaged in “sexual conduct” as defined by the Ohio Code, which includes nearly all types of sexual intercourse and penetration. If the sexual conduct occurred when at least one of the following sets of facts was true and the parties were not married to one another, the offender is guilty of sexual battery under Ohio Code § 2907.03

  1. Coercion: The offender knowingly coerced the victim to submit to the sexual conduct by any means that would have prevented an ordinary person from resisting.
  2. Substantial Impairment: The offender engages in sexual conduct with the victim, knowing that the victim’s ability to control his/her conduct or understand the nature of the situation is “substantially impaired.”
  3. Unconscious: The victim is unaware the act is being committed, and the offender knows this, i.e., an unconscious victim.
  4. Mistaken Identity: The victim only submitted to the sexual conduct because she/he mistook the offender for his/her spouse, and the offender knew the victim believe him/her to be the victim’s spouse.
  5. In Loco Parentis: The offender is the victim’s parent (biological or adoptive), stepparent, guardian, custodian, foster parent, or someone in loco parentis to the victim. Ohio defines “in loco parentis” as an adult caretaker of a minor, including relatives, who is charged with the rights and responsibilities of a parent in the parent’s absence and has a presence in the child’s home. This is a strict liability crime. It does not matter if the victim consented.
  6. Legal Custody/Inpatient: The victim is in legal custody or a patient in a hospital or related institution, and the offender has supervisory or disciplinary authority over the victim. This is a strict liability crime. It does not matter if the victim consented.
  7. Student/Teacher: The victim is a student, and the offender is a teacher, administrator, coach, or employee with authority of the student’s school. This is a strict liability crime. It does not matter if the victim consented.
  8. Minor at College: The victim is a minor student (under 18) attending college, and the offender is a teacher, administrator, coach, or employee with authority of the college. This is a strict liability crime. It does not matter if the victim consented.
  9. Coach/Trainee: The victim is a minor, and the offender is the victim’s coach, instructor, and/or troop leader, or the offender is a person given temporary/occasional disciplinary control over the victim. This is a strict liability crime. It does not matter if the victim consented.
  10. Counselor/Patient: The offender is a mental health professional, the victim is his/her client, and the offender coerces the victim into submitting to the sexual conduct by falsely representing the sexual conduct is necessary to treat the victim’s mental health condition. 
  11. Warden/Prisoner: The offender is an employee of a detention facility at which the victim is incarcerated. This is a strict liability crime. It does not matter if the victim consented.
  12. Cleric/Minor: The offender is a cleric, and the victim is a minor who attends the church or congregation the cleric serves. “Clerics” include priests, rabbis, clergy, Christian Science practitioners, or an ordained/accredited/licensed minister of an established church, denomination, or sect. This is a strict liability crime. It does not matter if the victim consented. 
  13. Police Officer/Minor: The victim is a minor and the offender is a “peace officer” more than two years older than the victim. “Peace officers” include, but are not limited to, police officers, sheriffs, marshalls, university police officers, natural resource officers, fire investigations officers, certain transportation officers, and those vested with criminal investigative authority. This is a strict liability crime. It does not matter if the victim consented.  

Notice that even if the victim consented and/or the parties were in a consensual sexual relationship, you may still be guilty of sexual battery in Ohio.


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2.  The Ohio Sexual Battery Statute & Common Uses as a Lesser Included Offense

Sexual battery is criminalized in Ohio under Ohio Code § 2907.03. Those convicted of § 2907.03 charges are guilty of a felony regardless of whether the sexual conduct was consensual or the victim “would have consented” if not impaired. Provided the sexual conduct falls under one of the thirteen categories listed above, the offender may be charged with sexual battery. The sexual battery statute does not apply if the parties to the alleged offense, i.e., the victim and alleged offender, were married. This does not mean, however, that nonconsensual sexual conduct between married individuals is always permissible. A married offender may still be charged with certain categories of rape or another type of Ohio sexual offense, just not sexual battery. 

Sexual battery is often charged as a lesser included or secondary offense to rape in Ohio. Having an experienced Ohio sex crimes defense attorney analyze your indictment is essential for understanding the charges and potential penalties. For example, having sexual relations with a minor under the age of 13 is rape in Ohio, but if the offender was the minor’s Boy Scout leader, he is also guilty of sexual battery. These are two separate criminal sexual offenses in Ohio because they require prosecutors to prove two different sets of facts even if some facts overlap. An offender would have to defend against the elements of both rape and sexual battery in this scenario. 

On the other hand, both the Ohio rape and sexual battery statutes criminalize sexual conduct if the offender drugged the victim, and as a result, she was unable to consent to the sexual encounter. These charges are premised on the same set of facts, and it’s necessary to commit the less serious crime (sexual battery) in order to commit the more serious crime (rape). The necessary lesser crime is called a lesser included offense. If the offender drugged the victim, this qualifies as both rape and sexual battery in Ohio, but the offender can’t be convicted of both offenses. He or she will be convicted of the highest-level offense proved at trial.

Sexual battery acts as the “lesser-included” charge and “disappears” following a rape conviction on these facts. However, if the jury in a rape case cannot determine that the offender drugged the victim (the necessary additional element for rape), but the victim was indeed incapacitated, the jury may convict the offender of sexual battery as the lesser included offense. Speak to an experienced Columbus sex crimes defense lawyer to understand the crimes you’re facing prosecution for. Prosecutors may allow offenders to plead to a lesser included offense, such as sexual battery, pursuant to a plea agreement.


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3.  Understanding the Legal Elements of Sexual Battery in Ohio

The rule of lenity dictates that if the language of a criminal statute is unclear, the court must interpret the law in favor of the criminal defendant. It cannot read additional elements into a criminal statute. As such, prosecutors must prove each element of sexual battery beyond a reasonable doubt, as written in Ohio Code § 2907.03, to sustain a sexual battery conviction. The essential elements of sexual battery depend on the category under which the offender has been charged, but there are two common elements that must be proved in every Columbus sexual battery prosecution: 

  • (1) The parties were not married. The burden is on prosecutors to show that the alleged defendant and victim were not married at the time of the alleged offense. Unlike rape charges, it does not matter if the parties were living separately at the time.
  • (2) The parties engaged in “sexual conduct” as defined by Ohio law when the categorical facts were present. Sexual conduct is specifically defined, and conduct that falls short of the Ohio statutory definition of sexual conduct cannot sustain a sexual battery prosecution.

Additionally, prosecutors must prove that an offender charged under one of the first four categories of sexual battery actually knew or “should have known” the qualifying facts were present. This is called the mens rea. For example, an offender charged with sexual battery due to the victim’s substantial impairment must have known the victim was impaired and couldn’t make rational choices. Knowledge, however, isn’t just actual knowledge. The law may impute the knowledge to the offender if a reasonable person in the offender’s situation should have known the victim was likely impaired. This will typically be a question for the jury.

The remaining categories of sexual battery in Ohio are called “strict liability” crimes. This means the crime occurs when the facts are present regardless of the parties’ consent, knowledge, or mindset. For example, prosecutors need only prove the necessary elements and show that the offender was a prison warden and the victim a prisoner at the time of the offense. Force, lack of consent, age, and/or lack of impairment are not relevant to sexual battery charges for a strict liability sexual offense.


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4.  Sexual Battery Investigations, Special Prosecutors, and Common Evidence Used in Sexual Battery Cases 

The City of Columbus has a dedicated team of sexual assault prosecutors and investigators. These sexual assault squads typically receive special training aimed at questioning victims and conducting sexual battery investigations. They handle these cases from start to finish and are often called as soon as a victim reports a sexual battery or requests a rape kit (sexual assault forensic examination) at a local hospital. Columbus rape kits typically contain the contact information for the local sexual assault investigative agency (typically an arm of the city or state police) and are turned into that department following completion. Rape kits typically include the following tools to gather evidence used in all types of sexual assault prosecutions: 

  • Swaps and test tubes to obtain foreign DNA evidence
  • Bags for the victim’s clothing
  • Nail clippers to collect the victim’s fingernails and look for evidence
  • A comb to collect foreign hairs from the victim’s body 

These kits are often essential for proving the parties engaged in sexual conduct as defined by Ohio law, which is a necessary element of sexual battery. 

DNA evidence gathered from a rape kit is almost always the primary evidence used to bring sexual battery charges in Ohio. Additional evidence includes the parties’ testimonies regarding their relationship, if any, the testimony of any witnesses to the alleged encounter or pre-encounter, video surveillance evidence, evidence of physical injury to the victim, and the victim’s blood test/hair analysis results to determine whether illegal drugs or alcohol were present in his/her system.

Controversy often arises in sexual battery cases when the parties attempt to introduce evidence of their opponent’s past sexual history, instances of sexual activity, opinion evidence regarding his/her sexual activity, and sexual reputation at trial. This is not strictly prohibited in sexual battery cases, but it’s generally not permitted in rape cases. Ohio judges will have to determine whether this evidence is necessary to form an essential defense or element of the sexual battery claim before permitting its introduction.


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5.  Ohio Court Process for Sexual Battery Cases & Common Evidence

Unlike the Ohio rape statute, the sexual battery statute does not provide for specialized evidentiary hearings or victim advocates. It also does not limit the type of testimonial evidence attorneys are permitted to use against the parties. While Columbus judges often take it upon themselves to apply the rape statute’s evidentiary procedures in sexual battery cases, the court process for sexual battery prosecutions follows the typical criminal prosecution schedule in Ohio. This includes:

  • Indictment: Because sexual battery is always a felony in Ohio, the Fifth Amendment requires the accused to be indicated by a grand jury before charges are officially filed.
  • Initial Appearance/Arraignment: A reading of the official charges against you where you are also informed of your rights, offered a Columbus criminal defense attorney if you cannot afford one, and, if you have a lawyer, asked whether you plead guilty or not guilty to the charges.
  • Discovery: The parties will exchange evidence, interview witnesses, conduct an additional investigation, and move to exclude and/or admit certain types of evidence. An experienced Columbus sexual battery defense attorney may move to have the charges dismissed on constitutional grounds or argue that certain evidence should be excluded during the discovery phase. After all evidence is gathered, a plea deal may be offered or requested.
  • Pretrial Hearings: In rape cases, the judge conducts a special “in chambers” hearing to determine which potentially sensitive evidence may be used at trial. This is not a statutory requirement in sexual battery cases, but many Columbus judges elect to utilize this procedure. This allows the court to determine whether introducing evidence of the parties’ sexual histories, both between one another and as related to other parties, is appropriate and necessary for conviction or defense.
  • Trial: The parties will select the jury and present their evidence. The prosecution must present evidence sufficient to prove each element of sexual battery beyond a reasonable doubt. If they do not, an experienced Columbus sexual battery defense attorney can move to dismiss all charges even before you need to present your defense.
  • Verdict/Sentencing: If the verdict is guilty, there can be a delay between trial and sentencing, while the judge considers all aggravating and mitigating circumstances surrounding the sexual battery case. He/she will then determine your sentence in accordance with Ohio sentencing laws. Your top-rated Columbus sex crimes defense lawyer may present mitigating evidence and argue for a reduced sentence at this hearing.

While Ohio public defenders are only required to make a basic appeal to a higher court, an experienced Ohio criminal defense lawyer from the Joslyn Law Firm can make a full and detailed appeal of your conviction, sentence, and all preserved pretrial decisions to the Ohio appellate court, Ohio Supreme Court, and if necessary, the United States Supreme Court. He or she may also prepare collateral relief petitions on your behalf, something Ohio public offenders are not required to assist their clients with.


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6.  Possible Direct Penalties of an Ohio Sexual Battery Conviction 

Sexual battery is a felony in Ohio, but the level of the felony depends on the facts of the case. Sexual battery is generally a felony in the third degree. Third-degree felonies falling under Ohio Code § 2907.03 are punishable with one to five years imprisonment and/or a fine of up to $10,000. If the victim is under the age of 13, regardless under which category the sexual battery the offense falls, a conviction is punishable as a felony in the second degree with a mandatory minimum prison term of two years. The maximum prison term for a second-degree felony is typically between 8 and 12 years, and the offender may be subject to a fine of up to $15,000.

However, sexual conduct with a child under the age of 13 is rape in Ohio. This is a first-degree felony and a strict liability crime punishable with up to life imprisonment. With the help of an experienced Columbus sexual battery defense attorney, prosecutors may permit an offender to plea to sexual battery as a felony in the second degree in lieu of rape charges. Some prosecutors may also drop rape charges in favor of sexual battery charges if both offenders are minors. 

In addition to these potential penalties, Columbus judges often (and sometimes must) order the following: 

  • Mandatory post-release control (probation) following completion of the prison term
  • Mandatory restitution (compensation) to the victim for any costs incurred as a result of the sexual battery
  • Mandatory registration on the Ohio sex offender registry and possible designation as a sexually violent predator/child sexual predator
  • Payment of all investigation and court costs

The only way to avoid the direct penalties of a sexual battery conviction is to avoid a guilty verdict. Judges often impose the maximum penalties available for sexual battery offenses in Columbus. 


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7.  Possible Indirect Penalties of a Columbus Sexual Battery Conviction

Felony sex crimes convictions carry the same indirect penalties as any Ohio felony conviction. The collateral and often unanticipated consequences of a felony conviction in Ohio include: 

  • Temporary loss of the right to vote
  • Loss of all firearms rights for violent felons
  • Difficulty obtaining a mortgage, loan, or financing
  • Inability to travel outside the state or country
  • Ineligibility for public jobs
  • Inability to work for most major companies
  • Inability to obtain certain recreational licenses
  • Loss of certain public benefits
  • Difficulty getting into college

In addition to these consequences, a sexual battery conviction carries serious additional limitations after the imposition of a “sexual offender” status and registration on the Ohio Sexual Offender’s Registry. These include: 

  • Ineligibility for certain public programs, housing, and benefits
  • Inability to attend certain church services and use public facilities such as parks and pools
  • Loss of ability to foster/adopt children
  • Loss of child custody
  • Severe residency restrictions, i.e., inability to live within a certain range of a school zone
  • Inability to go near school property and attend off-premises school events, even for your child’s activities
  • Prohibition from certain university and college campuses
  • Ineligibility to obtain or loss of certain professional licenses, such as a teaching or nursing license
  • Inability to work or volunteer with children or work as a police officer or other public servant
  • Notification to all neighbors of your sex offender status
  • Appearance of personal information available to the public on the sexual offender registry
  • Periodic check-in and registration requirements with your local sheriff’s department

 In combination with the direct penalties of a sexual battery conviction under Ohio Code § 2907.03, these severe collateral penalties and restrictions make an Ohio sexual battery conviction a life-changing event. The only way to avoid these consequences is to avoid a conviction with the help of an experienced Ohio sexual battery criminal defense attorney at the Joslyn Law Firm.


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8.  Common Defenses to Sexual Battery Charges in Ohio

Because there are thirteen unique categories of sexual battery in Ohio, the defenses available to those accused of sexual battery in Columbus depend on the facts and circumstances of each case. The most common defenses raised specifically in sexual battery cases include: 

  • Marriage: This is a complete defense to sexual battery. The parties do not have to be living together but have to be legally married. Void marriages, i.e., those not recognized by Ohio, do not protect offenders from sexual battery charges. For example, marriage to a person under the age of 18 (17 in some cases), even with parental permission, is illegal. This means the marriage is void and will not protect an offender from sexual battery charges.
  • Lack of Knowledge Defense: Many sexual battery claims arise when both parties to the case were intoxicated. Intoxication is generally no excuse for criminal conduct, but for certain categories of sexual battery the offender must “know” that the victim did not have the capacity to consent. If the offender was intoxicated before the victim became intoxicated and could not or should not have known the victim was incapacitated, this may be a defense to sexual battery.
  • Defeating the Elements: All ambiguities in the Ohio sexual battery statute must be constituted in favor of the defendant. For example, if you’re being charged with sexual battery for having relations with a prison inmate, you must have been an employee of the prison as the statute states. This likely does not include independent contractors or employees of prison contractors (such as food service employees), as they are not “employed” by the prison itself. One of the primary defenses used by experienced Columbus sex crimes defense lawyers is to pick the weakest element of a prosecutor’s case and raise a reasonable doubt as to that element. Reasonable doubt as to a single element of the crime is enough to defeat sexual battery charges in Ohio. 

In addition to these common sexual battery defenses, raising a doubt as to the prosecution’s evidence during a pretrial hearing or after the close of the prosecution’s case may be enough to dismiss sexual battery charges. “He said/she said” is not enough to sustain a conviction for sexual battery in Ohio nor is DNA evidence alone in many cases. Further, the case should not go to trial if it’s clear during the pretrial hearing that the prosecution can in no way prove its case beyond a reasonable doubt. This often means showing the judge that the prosecution has no way of proving qualifying sexual conduct occurred. This is often due to a lack of DNA evidence.


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9.  FAQs Answered by Columbus Sexual Battery Defense Attorneys

Below are brief answers to the most common questions our Ohio sex crimes defense attorneys receive about Columbus sexual battery charges. 

 1. What is Considered Sexual Battery in Ohio? 

There are thirteen categories of sexual battery in Ohio as criminalized by Ohio Code § 2907.03. Sexual battery is typically charged when the parties aren’t married, engaged in qualifying sexual intercourse, and the victim was unable to give either legal or actual consent. This means Ohio law considered the victim too young or too vulnerable to give legal consent even if he/she gave actual consent or the victim was incapacitated and could not clearly consent to the conduct.

 2. How is Sexual Battery Different from Rape in Ohio?

The Ohio sexual battery and rape statutes actually overlap, and sexual battery may be a lesser included offense of rape. Further, statutory rape may be a lesser included offense of sexual battery. Rape typically requires purposeful action to coerce or force the victim to submit to the sexual conduct, whereas sexual battery may arise without purposing to engage in non-consensual sexual behavior. For example, rape requires the offender to have drugged the victim to incapacitate her before engaging in sexual conduct, whereas sexual battery charges only require the offender to have engaged in sexual conduct with a substantially impaired victim. Sexual battery further criminalizes certain types of consensual sexual conduct, whereas rape charges generally assume the victim (unless under the age of 13) would not have consented to the sexual contact.

 3. Is Sexual Battery a Felony in Ohio?

Yes, sexual battery is always a felony in Ohio, and you will be considered a felon after a sexual battery conviction. It is a felony in the third degree unless the victim was under the age of 13. In such cases, it is a felony in the second degree and considered rape. Sexual battery may be punished by up to 12 years imprisonment, and a mandatory sentence is imposed if the victim was under 13.

 4. Will I Go to Prison for Sexual Battery?

Almost certainly. If the victim was under the age of 13, those convicted of sexual battery must go to jail for at least two years. The judges do not have the discretion to waive or suspend this mandatory minimum sentence. For all other sexual battery convictions, there is no mandatory minimum prison sentence, but offenders regularly serve serious jail time.

5. Does a Conviction for Sexual Battery Make You a Sex Offender in Ohio, and if so, Will I Lose My Job?

Yes, a sexual battery conviction will make you a qualified sexual offender in Ohio. The judge will certify you as a sexual offender during sentencing, and you’ll be required to register on the Ohio sexual offender registry. Those convicted of sexual battery will likely lose their jobs if they work with children or in a position of public trust, i.e., police officer, firefighter, politician. They may also lose their jobs if a work contract specifies as such or they’re in a licensed profession, and the license is revoked. Sexual offenders may be fired from private companies as well. It is almost never illegal to fire someone because they were convicted of sexual battery. Speak with a qualified Columbus sexual battery defense attorney today if you’re concerned about your career.

 6. Do I Have to Join the Sex Offender Registry if I’m Convicted of Sexual Battery? 

Yes, you will have to register with and will appear on the Ohio sex offender registry after a sexual battery conviction. You must provide law enforcement with the following information, most of which is publically available: 

  • Legal name and/or aliases
  • Photo
  • Home address
  • Work address
  • Conviction type and/or criminal designation
  • Vehicle information
  • Screen names
  • Phone numbers
  • Email address
  • Any internet handles or alternative designations

 Anyone listed on the Ohio sex offender registry is subject to strict residency, work, and travel restrictions and is required to check in with law enforcement every few months. Sexual battery offenders may be listed on the registry for life.

 7. What are the Most Successful Defenses to Ohio Sexual Battery Charges?

Lack of evidence and marriage are the most common successful defenses to sexual battery charges in Ohio. Further, constitutional challenges to the proceedings and evidence may also result in a dismissal of Ohio sexual battery charges. Only an experienced Ohio sexual battery defense lawyer can analyze your case to determine the best available defense to Columbus sexual battery charges.

 8. What Should I Do If I’m Being Investigated, Arrested for, or Charged with Sexual Battery in Ohio?

Do not speak to the police, contact the victim, or discuss the case with potential witnesses! Instead: 

  • Stay off of social media – deactivate all profiles but save any relevant evidence
  • Invoke your Fifth Amendment right to silence
  • Invoke your Fifth and Sixth Amendment rights to an attorney
  • Immediately call an experienced Columbus sexual battery defense lawyer at the Joslyn Law Firm at 614-444-1900

Be respectful but vigilant in repeatedly asserting your constitutional rights, and do not contact the victim or his/her family and friends. Maintain a respectful distance and work with your Ohio criminal defense attorney to defeat unjustified sexual battery charges in Columbus.


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10. Ohio Sexual Assault Resources 

Ohio law requires every emergency hospital in the state to have a doctor, nurse, or physician’s assistant on call 24/7 to provide sexual assault examinations. They are required to inform any reported sexual assault victim about the medical and psychiatric services available to them, and they work closely with local law enforcement agencies to protect the health and wellbeing of sexual assault victims. Additional resources for victims of sexual battery, including advocacy, mental health, medical, and financial resources, include: 

Those facing Ohio sexual battery charges should contact the Joslyn Law Firm for a free sexual battery defense consultation online or by calling 614-444-1900. Utilizing public or private resources is not recommended if you’re subject to sexual battery charges as confidentiality laws bind only qualified Columbus defense lawyers. 

The dedicated Columbus sexual battery criminal defense attorneys at the Joslyn Law Firm will zealously and professionally protect the rights of those accused of sexual battery in Ohio. Contact our Columbus office online or by calling 614-444-1900 today for your free, confidential Ohio sexual battery defense consultation. 


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